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    Could Your Dog Be Stressed Out?

    Your golden retriever Dakota is the most energetic, sociable dog you’ve ever met. This fun-loving boy can’t get enough of his brisk neighborhood walks and dog park visits; and he loves everybody he meets. Lately, though, your five-year-old canine housemate’s behavior has changed. Although you can’t discount a medical problem, you wonder if your dog might be suffering from stress. Tomorrow, Dakota visits your Reynoldsburg veterinarian for a thorough examination and some expert behavioral counseling.

    Decreased Appetite

    Your rambunctious dog has quite a hearty appetite, and he generally gobbles his kibbles in mere minutes. Recently, though, your normally ravenous pooch doesn’t seem interested in his food, eating only a few bites during each meal. You don’t want your dog to become malnourished, so consult with your vet without delay.

    Unusual Aggression

    Your mellow, even-tempered dog loves romping with his canine buddies at the dog park. He’s attached to your family; and he has even made friends with your notoriously irritable cat. However, you’ve recently seen Dakota act aggressively toward other dogs; and he has even growled at you several times. Ask your vet to determine whether an underlying medical condition is to blame, or if your dog might be reacting to increased stress in his life.

    Antisocial, Sleepy Slug

    Your outgoing canine companion has a packed social calendar that would put a gossip columnist to shame. However, Dakota has recently seemed very hesitant to leave the house, even for his potty walks. He has also been sleeping much more than usual. Since this antisocial, lethargic behavior doesn’t match your dog’s normal habits, ask the vet to determine if your dog has fallen victim to stress.

    Add Some Exercise

    If your dog is healthy, giving him more exercise might help to knock down his stress level. If he already enjoys vigorous playtime, and thrives on attention, provide him with more of both. Ask your vet if your dog can handle especially energetic activities such as flyball or agility work.

    Provide a Refuge

    If parties, thunderstorms, or other known stressors bother your dog, stock a quiet refuge with a soft blanket and his favorite toys. Stay with him until he becomes calmer and less anxious.

    During Dakota’s physical exams, ask your Reynoldsburg veterinarian for more stress management tips. If your dog might be showing some similar symptoms, call us for expert advice.

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